Having unshakable personal integrity, building meaningful relationships, and making meaningful contributions are imperatives we learn from family, friends, and colleagues.

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Having self-awareness, humility, and patience are among the life-changing lessons of learning to be a parent and a team member (as well as a team leader since leadership is sometimes far easier than fellowship for many of us).

The other important qualities that define successful life, ultimately, or meaningful relationships and meaningful work. It will not be money or things or monuments by which we measure our lives at the end.

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It will be whether we have created and maintained good, strong, meaningful relationships – from family and friends to colleagues and employees. It will be whether we have contributed in some life-improving way, some meaningful way, to our organizations and communities, in the world. The most important reason to participate in anything is to contribute…

Turn your customers into your sales force.

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If you teach something, you learn it far more competently, and this way I have people continuing to learn at a more advanced level.

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I always looked at things from a life cycle standpoint, and I know that there are just so many years on this earth for each one of us and we need to make sure that our lives are lived in a constructive way. So my personal value system is built around the concept that I want to do the very best I can with all the talent that God has given me. If I do that, I‘ll be a success.

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Normally, a CEO has a higher level of self-motivation and a stronger desire for excellence than most people have. I believe that’s one of the things that sets us apart as a group. It’s not necessarily greed.

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Most people spend 95 percent of their time reacting to what comes at them. If you can instill in people a sense of continuous improvement and investment in their own lives, then they will be a lot happier with themselves and with their lives in the company.

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Most organization charts have a guy at the top, and there’s a pyramid beneath him going down. Around ten or twelve years ago, I realized that the pyramid here had been inverted. Instead of me being on the top, I was on the bottom, and everyone else was on top. I now assume that I work for the employees. We grew as a business to the point where basically I’m working for them. I know they think they are working for me, but that’s not how I see it.

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If I can provide capital, leadership, and a value system, and if the employees give it their best in terms of how to develop the business and how to satisfy the customers and exceed their expectations, then we will win.

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While we still need to do business and collect on our bills and the rest of it, in the end, maintaining those relationships is what’s important to me.

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